The Cape Group, Real Estate & Business Consulting 
The Cape Group Real Estate Centro.
c.p. 23450
Cabo San Lucas, BCS 23450
Phone: 624 14 31214 Mobile: 624 14 77526 Email The Cape Group

Professional Migration Service

Registered Migration Agents

The Cape Group Co. provides a cost effective and simplified immigration service for individual and business that do not have the time or resources to make an application themselves. Our professionals take the confusion and frustration out of the immigration process we made easy.

This personalized service provides you with affordable, fixed cost advice and easy to understand information that will suit your individual circumstances.

 

New Mexican Immigration Law comes into effect in November 2012

 

One important factor everyone needs to consider about the new Immigration rules is that, after November 9th of 2012 nobody will be granted RESIDENCY from within the country! This doesn’t mean that we can get RESIDENCY at the border, we will actually have to register with the MEXICAN CONSULATE from outside of Mexico in order to get Temporary or Permanent Residency, if you don’t already have an FM3 or FM2.

After reading the Regulations for the 2012 Mexican Immigration law I took some notes, I wanted to publish a basic summary of the points that I thought were pretty important for the expat community here in Mexico. This summary is going to be, as I said, basic and I’ll try to update some of the more detailed information as time passes.

 

Immigration filters

There are going to be basic immigration filters or checkpoints at airports, seaports and terrestrial border crossings, very similar to the border crossings now.

Once you get to the immigration filter the immigration authority will give you a temporary document that will prove your migratory status. At the time that you are given this document you will be asked the purpose of your trip to Mexico and the document will reflect that purpose, be it work, pleasure, etc. If you plan on staying in Mexico for more than 30 days you will have to trade the temporary document in at the immigration office closest to your home in Mexico.

At these immigration checkpoints, your may be asked to provide your passport, personal information, reason for trip, place of residence outside of Mexico, where you plan on staying in Mexico, who you will work for in Mexico, be that the case, activities in Mexico, income sources and how you are planning on leaving Mexico. It seems to me that this information is going to only be required from you in doubt about your intentions for coming into Mexico: children, families or well dressed tourists and business people probably not get hassled; arriving in the airport after finishing a few too many on the plane might get you an entrance interview. Use common sense.

Temporary and Permanent Residency

One of the major changes in the new immigration policy is the Temporary and Permanent residency instead of the FM3/FM2. This is the part that most interests the majority of the expat community and upon reading these sections I think everyone is going to be pleased.

**On a more technical note, I was a little displeased about some of the ambiguity in the wording in this section. There was a lot of talk about the removal of discretionary decision-making by the immigration offices, but in my opinion that still exists: in many parts of the regulations the wording “can be issued” is present instead of a more definitive “will be issued”.

Let me calm the fears of all of the expats who had FM3’s before now and were told  that their FM3’s would not transition nicely into Temporary Resident documents: They will, the regulations made a distinction that holders of No-Inmigrante Visitantes documents (FM3) will, upon expiration of their FM3, receive a Temporary Resident Status.

 

Temporary Resident Visa (Visa de residente temporal)

The temporary resident visa is issued to a non-Mexican who declares his/her intention to remain in Mexico for a period exceeding one hundred and eighty days and up to four years. The applicant must demonstrate one of the following:

        Sufficient economic resources to pay for accommodations and meals during their stay in Mexico

        Participation in a scientific research project or sample collection in Mexico or the territorial waters of Mexico, after having obtained the appropriate authorizations from the appropriate national authorities (e.g., INAH, etc.)

        Family relationship to a Mexican, temporary or permanent resident

        An invitation from an organization or a public or private institution in Mexico to participate in any activity for which they will gain no income. The invitation should be on letterhead and indicate the activity that the applicant will be performing, the duration and the address of the workplace and the person or company accepting responsibility to pay for their travel and living expenses. Otherwise, the applicant must demonstrate sufficient economic solvency to cover his/her living expenses during his/her stay in the country

        Ownership of real estate in Mexico with a value equivalent to the amount stipulated in the “General Administrative Provisions” which will be issued by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and has not yet been published in the Mexican Official Gazette

        Ownership of investments in Mexico that consist of:

o   Capital stock in Mexican companies in accordance with laws and other legal provisions, with a value that exceeds the amount provided for in the “General Administrative Provisions” (to be issued by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and published in the Mexican Official Gazette)

o   Movable or fixed assets used for commercial or business in accordance with laws and other legal provisions, whose value exceeds the amount provided for in the “General Administrative Provisions” (to be issued by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and published in the Mexican Official Gazette)

o   Development of economic and business activities in the country in accordance with laws and other legal provisions that generate formal jobs in terms of the “General Administrative Provisions” (to be issued by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and published in the Mexican Official Gazette)

The temporary resident visa will be valid for one hundred and eighty calendar days with a single entry. The applicant must apply for the resident card within the first thirty calendar days after their entry into Mexico. After 4 years with the temporary resident visa, the applicant can apply for the permanent resident visa.

Temporary Student Resident Visa (Visa de residente temporal estudiante)

This visa is issued to a non-Mexican who intends to enter into Mexico for courses, studies, research projects or training in educational institutions belonging to the Mexican national education system which will last for more than one hundred and eighty days. The temporary student resident visa is valid for one hundred eighty calendar days with a single entry. The applicant must apply for the resident card within the first thirty calendar days after his or her entry into Mexico.

Permanent Resident Visa (Visa de residente permanente)

This visa will be issued to a non-Mexican who intends to enter the country in order to reside indefinitely. The applicant must demonstrate one of the following situations:

        Family relationship to a Mexican or permanent resident of Mexico

        Retirement status, with sufficient monthly income to cover living expenses during their stay in Mexico. Currently, “sufficient monthly income” is 250 times the minimum salary in Mexico city for FM3 and 400 times the minimum salary for FM2. (The minimum daily salary at this writing is $62.33 pesos. That would make the minimums for visas $15,582.50 pesos and $24,932.00 pesos ($1215.35 USD and $1944.61 USD at $12.82 pesos to the USD).)

        Meeting the categories and the minimum score required to enter through the Point System under the “General Administrative Provisions” (to be issued by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and published in the Mexican Official Gazette)

        That he or she has been granted political asylum by the Mexican government

The permanent resident visa will be valid for one hundred and eighty calendar days with a single entry. The applicant must apply for their resident card within the first thirty calendar days after his or her entry into Mexico.

The Point System for Mexican Visas

There are eight basic categories in the selection criteria of the new Point System for eligibility for Permanent Residency. It is Mexico’s hope that these criteria will attract foreign investors or people with high competency in areas such as science, technology, sports, arts and humanities or any other skills that strengthen and promote the development and competitiveness of Mexico.

The selection criteria may include, but are not limited to, the following:

        Education level

        Work experience in areas of interest to the country that have high demand and low supply

        Work experience in other areas

        Investor

        Skills in science and technology

        Acknowledgements and international awards

        Spanish language proficiency

        Knowledge of Mexican culture

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs will issue the categories in the “General Administrative Provisions” which will be published in the Mexican Official Gazette. This will also include the weighting of points corresponding to each category, as well as the minimum score required to enter through this route.

The Ministry will review the Point System every three years, and if necessary will publish in the Mexican Official Gazette any addendums, modifications or deletions of categories. They may also change the weighting of points corresponding to each category, as well as the minimum scores and any other information in the Point System.

A non-Mexican who wishes to enter the country through the Point System must apply for visa at the consular office, attaching a completed pre-qualification form, accompanied by the documents proving that they meet the requirements of the category.

The non-Mexican holder of a temporary resident visa or temporary work visa who wishes to remain in Mexico when their visa runs out may request a change to the status of permanent resident status via the Point System.

 Regulations by the Secretaría de Gobernación in the Diario Oficial is here:

http://dof.gob.mx/nota_detalle.php?codigo=5270615&fecha=28/09/2012

 

 

 

 

 

IMPORTANT ADVICE (2010).

 All 32 Mexican immigration offices will be observing new immigration rules as of May 1st.The intent is to clarify, streamline and simplify processing requeriments for each immigration category. Applications currently being processed  and those filed before May 1 will be analized and processed based on current policies, practices and procedures.
 
Some of most relevant aspects of the new rules are the following:
All migratory forms for tourist, business visitors and technical, visitors with money generating activities who intend to stay in Mexico for up to 180 days, will be replaced for a single "FMM" form (Forma Migratoria Multiple). The FMM will serve as evidence of the foreign national`s immigration status while in Mexico.
 
The business visitor criteria are clearly defined. This new FMM form has an opcion for choosing the purpose of the visit as business which will generate a 180 day visa.
 
Soon, immigration officials will publish the formats of the new migration cards (in plastic , on diferent colors with a bar code and a ship) that will replace fm2 and fm3 booklets.
 
Consular Post will no longer issue FM2 or FM3 booklets. Instead, the Consular Post will place a visa sticker on the foreign national`s passport, upon receipt of the peticioner`s approval from immigration officials. 
 

Immigration Services Specialist

  • FMT (Tourist Visa).
  • FM3 (For retired with or without Fideicomiso, economic dependants, Independent, students, distinguished talent, workpermits, etc.)
  • FM2. (Retirees, investors, professionals, etc.)
  • Special permits to leave the country while you are applying for any kind of process at INM.
  • Urgent FM3 & FM2 Renewals.
  • IMMIGRADO Status.

 

 TOPICS OF INTEREST

 

 

I want to travel to Mexico as Tourist
You will need a visa if you are a citizen of:



 

The persons of the following countries have to obtain a visa to travel to Mexico as Tourist, Business Person or to Transmigrate. As Tourist and Business Person you will be able to remain in Mexico 180 days, to transmigrate you will be able to remain in Mexico 30 days.

  • Afghanistan
  • Albania
  • Algeria
  • Angola
  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Armenia
  • Azerbaijan
  • Bahrain
  • Bangladesh
  • Belarus
  • Benin
  • Bhutan
  • Bolivia
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Botswana
  • Brazil
  • Brunei
  • Burkina Faso
  • Burundi
  • Cambodia
  • Cameroon
  • Cape Verde
  • Central African Republic
  • Chad
  • China
  • Colombia
  • Comoros
  • Congo
  • Congo, Rep. Dem (Zaire)
  • Cote d'lvoire
  • Croatia
  • Cuba
  • Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Djibouti
  • Dominica
  • Dominican Republic
  • Ecuador
  • Equatorial Guinea
  • Egypt
  • Eritrea
  • Ethiopia
  • Fiji
  • Gabon
  • Gambia
  • Georgia
  • Ghana
  • Grenada
  • Guatemala
  • Guinea
  • Guinea Bissau
  • Guyana
  • Haiti
  • Honduras
  • India
  • Indonesia
  • Iran
  • Iraq
  • Jordan
  • Kazakhstan
  • Kenya
  • Kiribati
  • Korea, North
  • Kuwait
  • Kyrgyzstan
  • Laos
  • Lebanon
  • Lesotho
  • Liberia
  • Libya
  • Macedonia
  • Madagascar
  • Malawi
  • Maldives
  • Mali
  • Mauritania
  • Mauritius
  • Moldova
  • Mongolia
  • Montenegro
  • Morocco
  • Mozambique
  • Myanmar (Burma)
  • Namibia
  • Nauru
  • Nepal
  • Nicaragua
  • Niger
  • Nigeria
  • Oman
  • Pakistan
  • Palestine
  • Papua New Guinea
  • Peru
  • Philippines



     

  • Qatar
  • Russian Federation
  • Rwanda
  • Sahrawi Arab Dem. Rep.
  • Saint Kitts and Nevis
  • Saint Lucia
  • Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Sao Tome and Principe.
  • Saudi Arabia
  • Senegal
  • Serbia
  • Seychelles Islands
  • Sierra Leone
  • Solomon Islands
  • Somalia
  • South Africa
  • Sri Lanka
  • Sudan
  • Surinam
  • Swaziland
  • Syrian Arab Republic
  • Taiwan (China)
  • Tajikistan
  • Tanzania
  • Thailand
  • Timor-Leste
  • Togo
  • Tonga
  • Tunisia
  • Turkey
  • Turkmenistan
  • Tuvalu
  • Uganda
  • Ukraine
  • United Arab Emirates
  • Uzbekistan
  • Vanuatu
  • Vietnam
  • Western Samoa
  • Yemen
  • Zambia
  • Zimbabwe

 

Countries that do not need a visa:


 

The persons of the following countries do not require visa to travel to Mexico as Tourist, Business Person or to Transmigrate. As Tourist and Business Person you will be able to remain in Mexico 180 days, to transmigrate you will be able to remain in Mexico 30 days.

  • American Samoa
  • Andorra
  • Anguilla
  • Argentina
  • Aruba
  • Australia
  • Austria
  • Azores Islands
  • Bahamas
  • Barbados
  • Belgium
  • Belize
  • Bermuda
  • British Indian Ocean Territory
  • British Virgin Islands
  • Bulgaria
  • Canada
  • Cayman Islands
  • Chile
  • Christmas Island
  • Coconut Island
  • Cook Islands
  • Costa Rica
  • Cyprus
  • Czech Republic
  • Denmark
  • Estonia
  • Falkland Islands
  • Faroe Islands
  • Finland
  • France
  • French Guiana
  • French Polynesia
  • Germany
  • Gibraltar
  • Greece
  • Greenland
  • Guadalupe
  • Guam Islands
  • Hong Kong* (China)
  • Hungary
  • Iceland
  • Ireland
  • Israel
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • Latvia
  • Lichtenstein
  • Lithuania
  • Luxemburg
  • Macao (China)
  • Mahore
  • Malta
  • Marianas Islands
  • Marshall Islands
  • Martinique
  • Micronesia
  • Monaco
  • Montserrat
  • Netherlands
  • Netherlands Antilles
  • New Caledonia
  • New Zealand
  • Niue Islands
  • Norfolk Island
  • Norway
  • Palau
  • Panama
  • Paraguay
  • Pitcairn Islands
  • Poland
  • Portugal
  • Puerto Rico
  • Réunion
  • Romania
  • San Marino
  • Santa Helena
  • Singapore
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia
  • South Korea
  • Spain
  • Sweden
  • Switzerland
  • Tokelau
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • Turks and Caicos Islands
  • United Kingdom of Great Britain
  • United States of America
  • Uruguay
  • Venezuela
  • Virgin Islands (U.S.A)
  • Wallis and Furtuna Islands


     


 


 

A stamp in the passport

The persons of the following countries do not require visa, but they have to obtain a stamp in their passport to travel to Mexico as Tourist, Business Person or to Transmigrate. As tourist or business person you will be able to remain in Mexico 180 days, to transmigrate you will be able to remain in Mexico 30 days.

El Salvador Jamaica Malasia


 

The aliens could obtain the stamp in their passport in any Mexican Consulate; there is more of 130 in the world.

As a businessperson, business visitor, consultant, or intercompany transferee, for non-remunerated activities:
If you are a citizen of:

 

  • Andorra
  • Argentina
  • Australia
  • Austria
  • Belgium
  • Canada
  • Czech Republic
  • Chile
  • Costa Rica
  • Denmark
  • Estonia
  • Finland
  • France
  • Germany
  • Greece
  • Hong Kong
  • Hungary
  • Ireland
  • Iceland
  • Israel
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • Latvia
  • Lichtenstein
  • Lithuania
  • Luxemburg
  • Monaco
  • Norway
  • New Zealand
  • Poland
  • Portugal
  • San Marino
  • Singapore
  • Slovenia
  • Slovakia
  • South Korea
  • Spain
  • Sweden
  • Switzerland
  • The Netherlands
  • United Kingdom
  • Uruguay
  • United States of America
  • Venezuela

You can enter Mexico without a visa showing your passport and the "migration Form for Tourists, Transmigrants, Visiting Businesspersons, or Visiting Consultants", which you can obtain from travel agencies, airlines, or at your point of entry into Mexico.

You may stay in Mexico for up to 180 days. if you need more time, you must visit any National Institute of Migration office (http://www.inm.gob.mx/index.php?page/MEN_DIRECTORIO) to obtain form FM3.

This option also applies for permanent legal residents in the USA, Canada, or Japan regardless of nationality.
Under an agreement with Canada and the USA, those countries' citizens may prove their nationality with a passport or other public documents, such as:

 

  • Certified copy of birth certificate.
  • Voter registration card.
  • Naturalization certificate.

If any of these documents lack a photograph, travelers must prove their nationality with another official identification:

 

  • Driver's license.
  • Identification issued by a state or official agency.

Although Canadian and US citizens do not need a passport, the National Institute of Migration recommends one to expedite passage through the point of entry.

To enter Mexico as business, the persons, the citizens of countries different form the list above, must go to the Embassy or Consulate of Mexico to obtain a migratory form FM3.

* Chinese citizens with passports issued by the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region.

IMPORTANT: From January 23, 2007, american citizens who travel to Mexico, to return to united States airway they will have to present an in force passport.

 

 

I want to live in Mexico with funds I receive from abroad:

You must contact the nearest Mexican Embassy or Consulate to apply for your visa and migration form as a Visiting Pensioner (www.sre.gob.mx/acerca/directorio/delegaciones/dirdelegaciones.htm).

In this case, you must submit:

  • Passport or valid identification and travel document.

     

  • Letter from a Mexican or foreign bank or financial institution or trust institution proving that you receive a minimum monthly income of approximately US$ 1,000.00. This amount will increase by US$ 500.00 for each of your economic dependents.

     

  • For family members (spouse, children, or parents) to accompany you, you must prove their status.


 

To obtain form FM3, you must submit:

  • Proof of payment of duties.

     

  • Completed form FM1.

     

  • Five photographs (4X4 cm), 3 front and 2 right profile (2.5 cm from chin to hairline), white background, with forehead and ears uncovered, and without earrings or eyeglasses. Instant photographs are not acceptable.


 

Important. Foreign nationals must obtain permission from the National Institute of Migration to change or expand their activities
 

 

 

I want to study in Mexico:

You must contact the nearest Mexican Embassy or Consulate to apply for your visa and migration form (www.sre.gob.mx/acerca/directorio/delegaciones/dirdelegaciones.htm).

In this case, you must submit:

  • Passport or valid identification and travel document.

     

  • Proof of enrollment or letter of acceptance from the school you plan to attend, specifying level, grade, duration of your planned studies, and field of study.

     

  • Proof of economic solvency and periodic and uninterrupted receipt of the sum of US$ 300.00 monthly, for your living expenses for the duration of your studies or documentation proving that you have been granted a scholarship for the period in question.

     

  • For family members (spouse, children, or parents) to accompany you, you must prove their status.

 

To obtain form FM3, you must submit:

 

  • Proof of payment of duties.

     

  • Completed form FM1.

     

  • Five photographs (4X4 cm), 3 front and 2 right profile (2.5 cm from chin to hairline), white background, with forehead and ears uncovered, and without earrings or eyeglasses. Instant photographs are not acceptable.

     

Important. Foreign nationals must obtain permission from the National Institute of Migration to change or expand their activities.
 

 

I lost my tourist migration form:

You must visit any National Institute of Migration office or delegation to apply for a replacement of your tourist migration form Directorio

The requisites are as follows:

  • Passport or valid identification and travel document

     

  • Police report confirming the loss or theft of your migration form.

     

  • Payment of duties

 

 

I would like to live in Mexico

And live with funds I receive from abroad:

If you are already in Mexico and have decided to establish residency here, you must apply for a change of migration status at any National Institute of Migration office Directorio
 

In this case, you must submit:

  • Application for change of migration status to Resident Pensioner.

     

  • Passport or valid identification and travel document.

     

  • Letter to the National Institute of Migration, in Spanish and with your signature, stating your reasons for wanting to establish residency in Mexico.

     

  • Letter from a from Mexican or foreign bank or financial institution or trust proving that you receive sufficient economic resources from abroad and that from such resources, from the yields they produce, or from your investments in Mexico you will obtain a monthly income of US$ 1,500.00 for one year.

     

  • This amount will increase by US$ 750.00 for each family member accompanying you.

     

  • If a foreign national proves acquisition of real estate intended for his/her own use, such as a house, the National Institute of Migration may authorize reduction of the aforementioned minimum by up to half.

     

    To obtain form FM2, you must submit:
     

    • Proof of payment of duties.

       

    • Completed form FM1.

       

    • Five photographs (4X4 cm), 3 front and 2 right profile (2.5 cm from chin to hairline), white background, with forehead and ears uncovered, and without earrings or eyeglasses. Instant photographs are not acceptable


       

      Important. Foreign nationals must obtain permission from the National Institute of Migration to change or expand their activities. 

 

And practice my profession:

If you are already in Mexico and have decided to establish residency here, you must apply for a change of migration status at any National Institute of Migration office Directory.

In this case, you must submit:

  • Application for change of migration status to Resident Professional.
  • Passport or valid identification and travel document.
  • Letter to the National Institute of Migration, in Spanish and with your signature, stating your reasons for wanting to establish residency in Mexico.
  • If you intend to work independently, you must submit a sworn, signed statement specifying your intended activity and where you intend to work.
  • Letter to the National Institute of Migration, on letterhead stationery, in Spanish or translated to Spanish, from the Mexican or foreign public or private institution that intends to employ you, specifying:
    • The nature of the project or activity in which you will be employed.
    • The remuneration you will receive.
  • If your employer is an individual, s/he must submit:
    • Proof that s/he engages in business activities.
    • If she is a foreign national, valid migration document.
  • If your employer is a legal entity, it must submit:
    • Articles of incorporation.
    • Last tax return filed (or electronic receipt).
    • If it is a foreign national, proof of entry in the National Registry of Foreign
    • Investment.

These requisites do not apply if the prospective employer is a government agency or organization or public institution of higher education or if the company has an up-to-date basic file.

  • Professional degree and, if applicable, professional license issued by the Directorate General of Professions of the Ministry of Public Education www.sep.gob.mx. If you practice a profession that requires a degree, you must comply with the regulatory conditions of Article 5 of the Mexican Constitution in relation to professions.

 

 
And assume a management position in a company:

If you are already in Mexico and have decided to establish residency here, you must apply for a change of migration status at any National Institute of Migration office Directory.

In this case, you must submit:

  • Application for change of migration status to Resident Executive.
  • Passport or valid identification and travel document.
  • Letter to the National Institute of Migration, in Spanish and with your signature, stating your reasons for wanting to establish residency in Mexico.
  • Employment agreement or job offer letter from your employer, on letterhead stationery and written in Spanish or translated to Spanish, specifying:
    • The position you are to occupy.
    • Your intended workplace.
  • The effective term of the employment agreement will be subject to your migration authorization.
  • If your employer is an individual, s/he must submit:
    • Proof that s/he engages in business activities.
    • If s/he is a foreign national, valid migration document.
  • If your employer is a legal entity, it must submit:
    • Articles of incorporation.
    • Last tax return filed (or electronic receipt).
    • If it is a foreign national, proof of entry in the National Registry of Foreign Investment.

    These requisites do not apply if the prospective employer is a government agency or organization or public institution of higher education or if the company has an up-to-date basic file.

    And assume a management position in a company:

    If you are already in Mexico and have decided to establish residency here, you must apply for a change of migration status at any National Institute of Migration office Directory.

    In this case, you must submit:

    • Application for change of migration status to Resident Executive.
    • Passport or valid identification and travel document.
    • Letter to the National Institute of Migration, in Spanish and with your signature, stating your reasons for wanting to establish residency in Mexico.
    • Employment agreement or job offer letter from your employer, on letterhead stationery and written in Spanish or translated to Spanish, specifying:
      • The position you are to occupy.
      • Your intended workplace.
    • The effective term of the employment agreement will be subject to your migration authorization.
    • If your employer is an individual, s/he must submit:
      • Proof that s/he engages in business activities.
      • If s/he is a foreign national, valid migration document.
    • If your employer is a legal entity, it must submit:
      • Articles of incorporation.
      • Last tax return filed (or electronic receipt).
      • If it is a foreign national, proof of entry in the National Registry of Foreign Investment.

      These requisites do not apply if the prospective employer is a government agency or organization or public institution of higher education or if the company has an up-to-date basic file.

 

To engage in artistic activities or professional sports:

If you are already in Mexico and have decided to establish residency here, you must apply for a change of migration status at any National Institute of Migration office Directory .

In this case, you must submit:

  • Application for change of migration status to Resident Investor.
  • Passport or valid identification and travel document.
  • Letter to the National Institute of Migration, in Spanish and with your signature, stating your reasons for wanting to establish residency in Mexico and specifying whether you will conduct your activities independently.
  • Degrees, certificates, diplomas, or other documents accrediting artistic or athletic capacity appropriate for your intended activity.
  • Letter to the National Institute of Migration, signed by an authorized representative of your employer, stating:
    • Your intended activities.
    • Your intended workplace(s).
    • Your economic remuneration.
  • If your employer is an individual, s/he must submit:
    • Proof that s/he engages in business activities.
    • If s/he is a foreign national, valid migration document.
  • If your employer is a legal entity, it must submit:
    • Articles of incorporation.
    • Last tax return filed (or electronic receipt).
    • If it is a foreign national, proof of entry in the National Registry of Foreign

    Investment

  • These requisites do not apply if the prospective employer is a government agency or organization or public institution of higher education or if the company has an up-to-date basic file.
  • In the case of minors, permit granted or notarized by the parents before a competent authority, apostilled by a government authority in the issuing country or legalized by the corresponding Mexican consulate and translated to Spanish.

 

 

I would like to work in Mexico:

  • If you intend to engage in any paid activity.
  •  
  • You must have a job offer in Mexico. The company, institution, or person in Mexico that intends to employ you must process your working papers with the National migration Institute. The requisites are as follows:
     
    • Copy of your passport or valid identification and travel document.

       

    • Letter to the National Institute of Migration, on letterhead stationery, written in Spanish, from the Mexican or foreign public or private institution that intends to employ you, requesting your entry, specifying your intended activity, pay, estimated time in Mexico, and place in Mexico where you will be working.

       

    • Documents accrediting your capacity, expertise, and experience in the field in which you intend to engage in activities of a technical or scientific nature, such as diplomas, certificates, degrees, accreditations, academic transcripts, or similar documents demonstrating your technical, scientific, professional, or academic qualifications, duly apostilled or legalized and translated to Spanish by an official expert translator.

       

    • If the applicant is an individual, s/he must:

       

      • Prove that s/he engages in business activities.

         

      • If s/he is a foreign national, valid migration form.
         
    • If the applicant is a legal entity, it must submit:

       

      • Articles of incorporation.

         

      • Last tax return filed (or electronic receipt).

         

      • If it is a foreign national, proof of entry in the National Registry of Foreign Investment.
         

      These requisites do not apply if the prospective employer is a government agency or organization or public institution of higher education.

      For family members (spouse, children, or parents) to accompany you, you must prove their status.

       

      To obtain form FM3, you must submit:

      • Proof of payment of duties.

         

      • Completed form FM1.

         

      • Five photographs (4X4 cm), 3 front and 2 right profile (2.5 cm from chin to hairline), white background, with forehead and ears uncovered, and without earrings or eyeglasses. Instant photographs are not acceptable.
         

      Important. Foreign nationals must obtain permission from the National Institute of Migration to change or expand their activities.


     

  • If you represent a foreing company and you will not be paid for your work in Mexico
     

    You must submit a letter of assignment from your company. The company, institution, or person in Mexico must process your working papers with the National Institute of Migration. The requisites are as follows:
     

    • Copy of your passport or valid identification and travel document.

       

    • Letter to the National Institute of Migration on letterhead stationery, written in Spanish, from the Mexican or foreign public or private institution that intends to employ you, requesting your entry, specifying your intended activity, estimated time in Mexico, and place in Mexico where you will be working.
    • Notarized letter of assignment, duly apostilled or legalized and translated to Spanish by an official expert translator, stating the reason for your visit to Mexico and your economic compensation.
    • If the applicant is an individual, s/he must:
      • Prove that s/he engages in business activities.
      • If s/he is a foreign national, valid migration form.
    • If the applicant is a legal entity, it must submit:
      • Articles of incorporation.
      • Last tax return filed (or electronic receipt).
      • If it is a foreign national, proof of entry in the National Registry of foreign
      • Investments.

      These requisites do not apply if the prospective employer is a government agency or organization or public institution of higher education.

      For family members (spouse, children, or parents) to enter the country, you must prove their status.

    To obtain form FM3, you must submit:

    • Proof of payment of duties.
    • Completed form FM1.
    • Five photographs (4X4 cm), 3 front and 2 right profile (2.5 cm from chin to hairline), white background, with forehead and ears uncovered, and without earrings or eyeglasses. Instant photographs are not acceptable.

    Important. Foreign nationals must obtain permission from the National Institute of Migration to change or expand their activities.


     

     

I want to marry a Mexican citizen:

You must visit any National Institute of Migration office or delegation and apply for authorization to marry a Mexican citizen Directory.

The requisites are as follows:

  • Valid migration document of the foreign national.

     

  • Valid passport, if the foreign national is in Mexico as a tourist.

     

  • Proof of payment of duties (payments can be made at any bank. The National Institute of Migration does not receive payments).

     

  • Letter to the National Institute of Migration, signed by both parties, containing a sworn statement that neither of them have any legal impediment to marrying, indicating the number of the filing office or registry office where the marriage is to be celebrated, state, municipality, and city or town where it is located, and intended date of the marriage.

     

  • Document accrediting the Mexican party's nationality.

     

  • Valid official identification of the Mexican party.

     

  • If one or both parties are minors, original parental permission granted by the parents or guardians or emancipation document, duly legalized.

 

I want to acquire Mexican citizenship:

The National Institute of Migration does not handle this procedure. You must contact the Directorate of Nationality and Naturalization of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, which has offices in all states in Mexico. You can also consult the website: www.sre.gob.mx

Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
Dirección de Nacionalidad y Naturalización
Switchboard: 5063-3000, ext. 4081, 4087, 4722, 4075, and 4060.
Av. Ricardo Flores Magón No. 2, Anexo II, Planta alta,
Col. Guerrero, Deleg. Cuauhtémoc, C.P. 06995
México, D.F.
 

 

Migration Statuses and Categories:

The General Law on Population stipulates that foreign nationals may enter Mexico with two migration statuses:

  • Non-residents are foreign nationals that legally enter Mexico on a temporary basis.

     

  • Temporary residents are foreign nationals that legally enter Mexico with the intention of residing here and eventually acquiring permanent resident status.

     

  • Temporary residents who reside legally in Mexico for five years can acquire permanent resident status.

     

  • A permanent resident is a foreign national who acquires the right to reside permanently in Mexico.
     

Immigration Categories for Non-Residents:

 

I. Tourist
 

II. Transmigrant
 

III. Visitor
 

IV. Minister or Religious Associate
 

V. Political Refugee
 

VI. Refugee
 

VII. Student
 

VIII. Distinguished Visitor
 

IX. Local Visitor
 

X. Provisional Visitor
 

XI. Correspondent
 

Migration Categories for Immigrants:

 

I. Resident Pensioner
 

II. Investor
 

III. Professional
 

IV. I Executive
 

V. Scientist
 

VI. Technician
 

VII. Family Members
 

VIII. Artists and Sports Professionals
 

IX. Assimilated Individuals
 

 

I want to prolong my stay in Mexico as a tourist:

You must visit any National Institute of Migration office or delegation to apply for an extension of your tourist migration form Directory.

This procedure takes only a few minutes and the requisites are as follows:

  • Passport or valid identification and travel document.

     

  • Valid tourist migration form.

     

  • Proof that you have sufficient economic resources to prolong your stay.

     

  • Payment of duties.
     

As a tourist, you may stay in Mexico for up to 180 days.

 

 

 

I want to renew my FM3 or FM2:

You must visit any National Institute of Migration office or delegation to apply for an extension of your FM3 or an extension of your FM2 Directory.

The requisites are as follows:

  • Application form.
  • FM2 or FM3.
  • Conclusive documents proving that the conditions under which your entry was originally authorized subsist.
  • Payment of duties.

 

 

I lost my FM3 or FM2:

You must visit any National Institute of Migration office or delegation to apply for a replacement of your FM3 or FM2 Directory.

The requisites are as follows:

  • Passport or valid identification and travel document.

     

  • Police report confirming the loss or theft of your migration form.

     

  • Payment of duties.

     

  • Completed FM1.

     

  • Five photographs (4X4 cm), 3 front and 2 right profile (2.5 cm from chin to hairline), white background, with forehead and ears uncovered, and without earrings or eyeglasses. Instant photographs are not acceptable.
Marco Jurídico


Legislation:
 
 
Leyes

LEY FEDERAL DE LOS TRABAJADORES AL SERVICIO DEL ESTADO, REGLAMENTARIA DEL APARTADO B) DEL ARTÍCULO 123 CONSTITUCIONAL.

 

 | D.O.F. 28 de diciembre de 1963, última reforma D.O.F. 03-05-2003.


 


Reglamentos

REGLAMENTO DE LA LEY GENERAL DE POBLACIÓN

 

 | D.O.F. 14 de abril de 2000, última reforma 29 de noviembre de 2006
 


 


Acuerdos Administrativos

ACUERDO POR EL QUE SE DELEGAN EN EL COMISIONADO DEL INSTITUTO NACIONAL DE MIGRACIÓN, LAS FACULTADES DE EJERCER EL PRESUPUESTO AUTORIZADO ANUALMENTE AL INSTITUTO Y LAS FACULTADES ADMINISTRATIVAS QUE SE INDICAN

 

 | D.O.F. 24 de mayo de 1999.
 


 


Circulares

CIRCULAR NÚMERO R.E.-1 EN LA QUE SE DETALLAN LAS REGLAS A LAS QUE SE SUJETARÁ EL INGRESO TEMPORAL DE PERSONAS DE NEGOCIOS, DE CONFORMIDAD CON EL TRATADO DE LIBRE COMERCIO PARA AMÉRICA DEL NORTE (T.L.C.A.N.)

 

 | D.O.F. 9 de mayo de 1994.
 


 


Manuales

CIRCULAR No. 014 /2000 POR LA QUE SE DA A CONOCER EL MANUAL DE TRÁMITES MIGRATORIOS DEL INSTITUTO NACIONAL DE MIGRACIÓN.

 

 | D. O. F. 21 septiembre de 2000.

 



 

 


Avisos

AVISO POR EL QUE SE PUBLICAN LAS FORMAS MIGRATORIAS FM1, FORMATO DE FILIACIÓN QUE DEBEN LLENAR LOS EXTRANJEROS PARA EL TRÁMITE DE EXPEDICIÓN DE FORMAS MIGRATORIAS FM2 Y FM3, CON INSTRUCTIVO DE LLENADO; FM2 (DOCUMENTO MIGRATORIO DE INMIGRANTE); FM3 (DOCUMENTO MIGRATORIO DE NO INMIGRANTE); FME ROJA (FORMA MIGRATORIA ESTADÍSTICA PARA EXTRANJEROS), CON INSTRUCTIVO DE LLENADO; ASÍ COMO FME NEGRA (FORMA MIGRATORIA ESTADÍSTICA PARA MEXICANOS), CON INSTRUCTIVO DE LLENADO.

 

 | D.O.F. 29 de junio de 2005.

 

 


Todas las disposiciones se relacionan en orden cronológico por su fecha de publicación en el Diario Oficial de la Federación.

Over 10 years of experience providing Professional Immigration Services.

 

What is Mexico's Immigration Policy?

Mexico's General Law of Population sets out the rights and obligations of foreigners, as well as the different statuses associated with foreign immigration.

Types of Immigrant Permits

There are two kinds of permit: Non-Immigrant and Immigrant:

  • Non Immigrant Permits are for people who intend to visit Mexico for a specific purpose and then depart;
  • Immigrant Permits are for people who wish to gain permanent residence in Mexico.

Applying for Mexican Visas

You may apply for your visa(s) in person, or you may hire a representative to advise you, make the application on your behalf and do all of the paperwork. See Immigration Lawyers for more details.

Please Note: The information on this page is intended as a summary of basic principles and immigration procedures in Mexico. Exact procedures may vary by state and rules are subject to change at any time.

 

What are the Non-Immigrant Visas?

There are various classifications of Non-Immigrant visitors to Mexico - the main ones are listed below. Your local Mexican Consulate will be able to give you full details about how to apply (and in some cases, pay) for permits that are required in advance.

FMT - The Short-Term Non-Immigrant Visa

Short term visas are intended for visitors to Mexico on short term (six months or less) visits; usually tourists and short-term visitors. For trips of longer than six months, a non-immigrant or immigrant visa should be considered -- see the sections below for details. The FMT has a 'Business Visitor' section, specifically for persons who come to Mexico for short business visits not exceeding thirty days. FMT visas are issued by airlines and are also available at ports of entry* Also See: Entry Requirements for Tourists

FM3 - The Long-Term Non-Immigrant Visa

Mexico operates what is known as a FM3 Visa. The FM3 visa is a renewable long term (more than six months) permit which gives non-immigrant temporary residency status to the holder. This means that it gives a person the right to live in Mexico (under terms as set out in the visa) but it does not lead to, and cannot be converted to, a visa leading to permanent residency.

There are various categories under which FM3 visas are granted, and these relate to the activities you intend to undertake while in Mexico. Under the terms of the FM3, you are authorized to only undertake certain, specific activities which may be lucrative or non-lucrative, depending on the visa's classification.

One of the criteria that the Mexican authorities require for the issuance of a FM3 Visa is that the applicant prove that they have 'sufficient funds to sustain themselves while in Mexico' and/or a proven steady income. There is no official minimum or maximum amount -- every application appears to be dealt with on a case-by-case basis. Proof of funds and/or income is usually requested by means of bank account statements, proof of investment income, credit cards, or a combination of these.

Once applied for and granted, the FM3 may be renewed for an additional four years (for a total of five years). After this period, a new FM3 may be applied for and, if granted, will serve for another (max) five year period, renewable annually.

The FM3 visa may not be exchanged automatically for a visa leading to permanent residency (FM2); a FM2 must be applied for separately. Any years accrued under a FM3 visa are not transferable towards FM2-residency status (see FM2 Heading, below, for details).

You may apply for a FM3 visa while in Mexico and in possession of a short-term FMT (Tourist/Business Visitors Visa), or abroad via your nearest Mexican Consulate.

*To holders of passports from specific countries only.
See Mexico Entry Requirements for details.
If you are in doubt, contact your nearest Mexican Consulate

Types of Non-Immigrant Visas (Short and Long Term)


 

Tourist Permits (Also used for Temporary Business Visits)

These are the equivalent of the "Landing Card" in the EU or "Visa Waiver" in the US that non-nationals need to fill out and have stamped when they enter to visit.

The Mexican Tourist permit is known at the "FMT" ; it is very simple to fill out, and available from airlines and ports of entry.

This permit allows visitors to remain in Mexico for a maximum period of 180 days*. If the officer at the port of entry does not assign 180 days leave of stay at your point of entry, this permit can be extended to the maximum permitted stay if the original term granted (written on the form at the port of entry) was less than 180 days, by visiting one of the local immigration offices in Mexico, completing the paperwork and paying the administration fee.

You can use a FMT permit to enter Mexico for leisure and also if you plan to scout for and/or invest in Mexican real estate. When you are closing a real estate deal, you will need to show evidence to the Notary Public that your stay in Mexico is legal and a FMT is a valid document for this purpose.

Temporary Business Visits

The latest version of the FMT also contains a section for business travelers who are entering Mexico temporarily to conduct business there. If you are traveling on business, complete the second half of the FMT. Business travelers are given 30 days entry as standard.

*To holders of passports from specific countries only.
See Mexico Entry Requirements for details.
If you are in doubt, contact your nearest Mexican Consulate.

 

Traveler in Transit

Mexico used to issue 'traveler in transit visas'; however, as of February 17, 2004, foreigners passing through one of Mexico's international airports onto a third country no longer require a visa or any migratory documentation, provided that they remain at the airport and depart Mexico within 24 hours of arrival.

 

Visitors (Common for Longer Business Visits)

If you plan to visit Mexico on an extended stay for business reasons, then you are likely to be need one of these permits, although the normal FMT entry card (see Tourist Permits, above) now have a business section included for business travelers on temporary visits, so if your stay will only be temporary (see FMT information above) avoid the paperwork and administration charges involved with this permit and use the FMT instead.

For extended stays in Mexico, you must apply for the Visitors permit (usually a FM3) through your company and state what the purpose of the visit is, and how long it is likely to take. There are also some forms to fill out and a handling fee to pay. You can download the forms, and find out the latest fees and process by contacting your local Mexican Consulate. Visitor's Permits are issued for up to one year, and are renewable four times, for a maximum of one year each time - for a total maximum period of five years. After the initial five year period, a new FM3 may be applied for (for use over a consecutive five year period) if necessary.

 

Students

If you want to study in Mexico, a FM3 non-immigrant permit which enables you to live and study in Mexico can be granted by the Consulate. You must be able to prove your ability to be self-sufficient by showing a certain amount of funds in a bank account. The exact amounts change yearly - check with the Mexican Consulate nearest to you.

 

Artists and Sports People

These people can apply for an non-immigrant FM3 permit. Each case is considered individually and entry is at the Interior Ministry's discretion.

 

Distinguished Visitors

VIPs, Heads of State, persons on official visits, royalty, et al, can be issued with special visitor permits that last for six months. Contact your nearest Mexican Consulate for details.

 

Provisional Visitors

If you arrive in Mexico without the proper documentation for normal non-immigrant entry (e.g. your passport was lost en-route) you can be issued with a Provisional Visitor Permit that allows you 30 days to get the required documentation together necessary for application of normal entry. A deposit or bond is required to guarantee that you will return to where you came from.

 

Correspondents / Journalists

If you're involved in journalism or media, you can be issued with a FM3 Correspondent's Visa, that enables you to carry out journalism work. The permit lasts for a year, but can be renewed as many times as required, provided that you are continuing your journalism work.

 

Religious Ministers

Religious Ministers or Members of Religious Associations can be issued with a FM3 that allows them to undertake religious duties and services, regardless of which religion it is, as well as social services. Persons wanting this permit will need to register and show their Ministry qualifications.

Mexico's Immigrant Visas

Immigrant Visas are issued to foreign nationals who have the intention of living in Mexico for long periods of time (over one year) AND who intend to seek permanent residency in Mexico.

FM2 - The Immigrant Visa

FM2 visas are intended for people seeking permanent residency status in Mexico or those seeking eventual Mexican Citizenship.

There are various categories under which FM2 visas are granted, and these relate to the activities you intend to undertake while in Mexico. Under the terms of the FM2, you are authorized to only undertake certain, specific activities which may be lucrative or non-lucrative.

You must hold a FM2 for a qualifying period* before you may apply for "immigrant" status or Mexican Citizenship.

You do not need to have held a FM3 visa before applying for a FM2, and any years you may have accrued while living in Mexico under the auspice of a FM3 permit do not count towards your FM2 qualification period.

If your goal is to seek long-term residency in Mexico, or to become a Mexican Citizen, you should apply for FM2 status (or request a change of status from FM3 to FM2) so that your time starts counting towards the qualification period as soon as possible.

You may apply for a FM2 visa while in Mexico and in possession of a FMT (Tourist/Business Visitors Visa) or a FM3.

Following the qualification period, you may apply for full resident status. When your full residence status has been accepted, you are entitled to full rights (e.g. access to IMSS sickness pay) and responsibilities (e.g. pay income taxes) as any other Mexican Citizen. Naturalized citizens are also allowed to vote in Mexican elections.

When your full residence status has been accepted, you may also begin your application for Mexican Citizenship, although you do not have to do this; you can remain a 'resident alien' on a FM2 visa indefinitely.

Upon receiving immigrated status, you will receive a document that looks like a Mexican Passport (called a "FM2") -- newer versions look like a driver's license -- which enables you pass through Mexico's borders as if you were a Mexican National.

You do not, under Mexican law, need to surrender your national passport -- whether you remain a resident-alien or apply for citizenship -- which you'll use when you return to your home country: either for visits, or when returning home to dwell. You home country's policies may require you to surrender your passport and/or citizenship; check with your local authorities for details.

If you hold a FM2 visa and stay outside of Mexico for longer than 2 years, or for 5 years in any 10 year period, you will lose your permanent resident status in Mexico.

*Qualifying periods vary depending on your circumstances. Seek advice from an immigration lawyer about this matter.

Listed below are examples of the kinds of people who might apply for FM2 visas:

Retirees

If you are over 50 years of age, and want to engage in "non-remunerative activities" and you are receiving funds from abroad (from a pension or other investments or fixed income) you can apply for a Retiree Immigration Permit.

Investors

You can receive an immigration permit if you are willing to invest your capital in Mexico. You investment can be directed at industry or services, and must equal a minimum set amount--check with an immigration lawyer for the latest investment levels required for this visa.

Professionals

If you are a qualified professional, you can have your certificates validated by the Mexican Consulate in your home country and apply for an immigration visa to live in Mexico and seek permanent residence.

Technical or Scientific Professions

If you are a qualified technician or scientist, Mexico offers a category of visa which enables you to live and work in Mexico under sponsorship from a foreign company. For example, if the company wants to open an office or factory in Mexico, a person or persons representing that company may enter Mexico to manage the commercial operations on a long term basis.

Artists and Sports People

Artists or sports people who seek long term permanent residency in Mexico may apply for a FM2 visa. Each case is considered individually and entry is at the Interior Ministry's discretion.

 

May I be granted Mexican Citizenship?

Acquiring Mexican Citizenship (naturalization) is an involved process. As a minimum, you must have been living in Mexico for a qualifying period* under the auspice of a FM2 visa and have applied for, and been granted, permanent resident status (although exceptions to this rule may apply, depending upon a variety of circumstances).

Marriage to a Mexican national, for example, might enable naturalization with a shorter qualification period. We recommend that you contact an immigration lawyer for full counsel on these matters.

You will be asked to undertake an exam, which you must pass, in order to acquire naturalization/citizenship. An immigration lawyer will be able to advise you about the exam and what things you will need study and research in order to be able to pass it. The examination is of a "multiple choice" type, comprises of some fifteen questions, and is not hard; although you will need a basic grasp of the Spanish language to pass it.

*Qualifying periods vary depending on your circumstances. Seek advice from an immigration lawyer about this matter.

 

Which Mexican Visa is Right for Me?

Below are some examples of situations and the type of visa you may consider applying for. If you are in any doubt, we recommend you contact an Immigration Lawyer for advice and counsel in regard to your individual circumstances.

Non Immigrant (FMT and FM3)

When you do NOT want to seek permanent residence in Mexico

For Vacations and Casual Trips to Mexico: Simply fill out and use the tourist permit (FMT), available from the airline you travel with or the port of entry*

For Work Placements: If you plan to live and work in Mexico, a Visitor's Permit (FM3 Visa), renewable annually, is probably your best option.

For Other Activities: You should apply for a FM3 permit commensurate with your activity - e.g. Student, Journalist, Scientist, Professional, et al.

*To holders of passports from specific countries only.
See Mexico Entry Requirements for details.
If you are in doubt, contact your nearest Mexican Consulate.

Immigrant, Economically Active (FM2)

When you want to acquire permanent residency AND you want to work in Mexico:

You will need to satisfy the requirements for entry (e.g. professional, sponsored by a company, etc -- see notes above about FM2), OR be able and prepared to invest a significant amount of capital to apply for a FM2 investor's visa.

Immigrant, Not Economically Active (FM2)

When you want to acquire permanent residency but DO NOT want to work in Mexico:

If you are of retirement age (50+), and have a regular source of income from abroad (investments, savings, etc), then a Retiree FM2 visa will be the most straightforward route. NB: There is no 'official' minimum income, by law, that you need to prove; criteria and income levels vary and each application is dealt with on a case-by-case basis; you will need to contact your local immigration office in Mexico for the latest advice or hire an immigration lawyer to give you counsel based upon your individual circumstances.

If you are not of a retirement age (below 50) and want to live but not work in Mexico, you will need to contact the Mexican Consulate if you are not already in Mexico. If you are in Mexico, perhaps on a FMT visa, contact an immigration lawyer for advice. Provided that you can prove a steady income, you may be granted FM2 visa to live in Mexico and seek permanent residency. You will need to state what you intend to do there, e.g. early retirement due to health, etc. There are various routes to obtaining a FM2 visa and if you are unsure, the best course of action is to contact an immigration lawyer for counsel (see next section).

 

Immigration Lawyers

You may apply for Mexican Visas directly, in person, or you may hire a representative to do the paperwork and administration on your behalf.

How you go about applying for your visa will depend on your circumstances, how much Spanish you speak, and how much time you have to deal with the considerable bureaucracy involved in the application process.

If you are unsure which visa may be right for your circumstances, if you are having trouble with the application you made on your own, or if your Spanish language skills are rusty, then you may do well to hire the services of an immigration lawyer in Mexico.

A good immigration lawyer will be up-to-speed on the latest legislation as well as the latest "on the ground" policies being implemented at a local level. A lawyer will also be able to assess your individual circumstances and suggest a proper course of action, based on your personal situation, that will have the best chance of leading to a successful application. A good lawyer will also advise you if it is not possible for a person in your circumstance to make a successful application.

Hiring an Immigration Lawyer and representative will also avoid you having to make repeated trips to the Immigration Office, make lines and deal with the bureaucracy and extensive paperwork involved in acquiring your immigration documents. If your presence is required at the Immigration Office (e.g. to sign documents or give fingerprints), your lawyer will advise you and arrange to meet you there.

The support offered by a good lawyer can save you a considerable amount of time, especially if your application is complex. If you don't speak good Spanish then you will almost certainly require representation to expedite your visa(s).

The immigration services rendered by our firm have included general free counseling on the advantages and disadvantages of the different alternatives available for obtaining visas, assisting in developing documentation to maximize chances of visa approval, and the representation before the National Immigration Institute and the Secretariat of Foreign Relations.